Follicular Thyroid Cancer
New York Sinus & Thyroid Surgery Center – Edward J. Shin M.D.
New York Sinus & Thyroid Surgery Center – Edward J. Shin M.D.
Open Menu tel:646.943.7985
310 E. 14TH STREET 6TH FLOOR
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10003

Follicular Thyroid Cancer NYC

Follicular Thyroid Cancer Surgery

At New York Sinus & Thyroid Surgery Center, we offer surgical treatments for follicular thyroid cancer in NYC. Follicular thyroid cancer is the second most common type of thyroid cancer. However, many patients do not know they have follicular cancer because most cases do not display visible symptoms. More advanced forms of follicular cancer may result in lumps or bumps around the throat that can be detected during a routine check-up. Thankfully, follicular thyroid cancer is very treatable if caught early. The most common treatment method for this type of cancer is thyroid removal surgery. Thyroid cancer surgeon, Dr. Edward Shin, can surgically remove cancerous growths to stop the spread of follicular thyroid cancer to other parts of the body.

FOLLICULAR THYROID CANCER OVERVIEW
SECOND MOST COMMON FORM OF THYROID CANCER (APPROXIMATELY 25% OF ALL THYROID CANCERS)
AFFECTS THE THYROID’S FOLLICULAR CELLS
MORE AGGRESSIVE FORM OF CANCER THAN PAPILLARY CANCER, BUT VERY TREATABLE
DOES NOT ALWAYS DISPLAY SYMPTOMS; LUMPS AROUND THE THROAT MAY BE VISIBLE
TYPICALLY DETECTED BY A PHYSICAL EVALUATION OR SCREENING TESTS
BIOPSY CAN CONFIRM IF THE GROWTH IS CANCEROUS
FEMALE PATIENTS OVER 40 YEARS OLD ARE MORE LIKELY TO DEVELOP FOLLICULAR THYROID CANCER
MOST COMMON TREATMENT OPTION IS THYROID CANCER SURGERY
RADIOACTIVE IODINE, EXTERNAL BEAM RADIATION THERAPY, & ANTI-CANCER MEDICINES MAY ALSO BE USED
POST-TREATMENT INCLUDES ONGOING MONITORING & THYROID MEDICATION
Follicular Thyroid Cancer Treatment

What Is Follicular Thyroid Cancer?

Follicular thyroid cancer is a slow-growing cancer that affects the thyroid’s follicular cells. These cells use iodine from the bloodstream to produce thyroid hormones. Follicular cancer tumors are initially found in the thyroid, but can spread to other parts of the body without proper treatment. Follicular thyroid cancer is the second most common form of thyroid cancer (approximately 25% of all thyroid cancers are follicular). Follicular cancer is a more aggressive form of thyroid cancer than papillary cancer. However, follicular thyroid cancer is considered very treatable if diagnosed early.

What Causes Follicular Thyroid Cancer?

Like papillary thyroid cancer, follicular thyroid cancer occurs when the thyroid’s follicular cells multiply uncontrollably, forming cancerous growths. The cause of follicular thyroid cancer is not always known. However, there are many factors that may increase your risk of developing follicular thyroid cancer, such as:

RISK FACTORS FOR FOLLICULAR THYROID CANCER
A history of thyroid disorders
A family history of thyroid-related cancers
Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) or hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid)
Autoimmune diseases like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves’ disease
Past radiation exposure
Female patients are more likely to develop follicular cancer than men
Patients 40+ years or older are at increased risk

What Are The Symptoms Of Follicular Thyroid Cancer?

The majority of patients with follicular thyroid cancer do not display any visible symptoms. However, larger growths may lead to small lumps around the throat and neck that can be detected during a physical examination. Patients with advanced cases may also experience discomfort or difficulty speaking, swallowing, and breathing.

FOLLICULAR THYROID CANCER SYMPTOMS
MOST FOLLICULAR CANCERS SHOW NO SYMPTOMS
LUMPS AROUND THE THROAT
SWELLING OF THE NECK
DISCOMFORT AROUND THE LOWER NECK AREA
VOCAL CHANGES
DIFFICULTY SWALLOWING
TROUBLE BREATHING
CHRONIC COUGH WITH NO COLD OR FLU-LIKE SYMPTOMS PRESENT
HOARSE VOICE

How Is Follicular Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed?

Your doctor may be able to detect follicular thyroid cancer during a routine check-up. If this is the case, you will be referred to a thyroid specialist for additional screenings. Blood tests, ultrasounds, radioactive iodine uptake tests, and fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies may be performed to determine if your thyroid growth is follicular cancer.

Will A Biopsy Determine My Follicular Thyroid Cancer?

An FNA biopsy uses laboratory testing to determine whether your growth is malignant (cancerous) or benign (non-cancerous). During your biopsy, a tiny needle is inserted into the growth to extract a sample. This sample is then sent to a pathologist for comprehensive tests. The results of your biopsy will be known within a few days.

What Are Some Common Follicular Thyroid Cancer Treatments?

Advances in technology have led to many innovative cancer treatments. The most common method for treating follicular thyroid cancer is thyroid removal surgery. Our thyroid doctor may combine additional techniques for a comprehensive approach. Below are some common cancer treatments that may be used to treat your follicular thyroid cancer.

FOLLICULAR THYROID CANCER TREATMENTS
Thyroid Removal Surgery
Thyroid surgery is usually recommended to remove cancerous growths from the thyroid gland. Depending on the extent of your follicular cancer, our thyroid surgeon may remove the entire thyroid to prevent the cancer from spreading to other parts of the body.
Radioiodine Treatment
Radioactive iodine (RAI) is a non-surgical treatment option to treat follicular cancer cells. Radioiodine is administered orally (typically in a pill or liquid dosage). The radioactive iodine is swallowed and then travels to the thyroid gland. Cancerous follicular cells absorb the radioiodine, destroying them.
External Beam Therapy
External beam therapy uses radiation to destroy cancerous cells. The machine used to deliver radiation is called a linear accelerator. The patient lies flat while the linear accelerator moves around the patient, sending targeted radiation to the thyroid.
Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy may be used alongside other methods when treating follicular thyroid cancer. This method uses anti-cancer medicines that are either taken by mouth or injected into the body. Chemotherapy attacks cancer cells that quickly divide and multiply.
Targeted Therapy
Targeted therapy is another type of treatment that can attack cancerous follicular cells. These medicines selectively target the proteins and genes of cancer cells to destroy them. Targeted therapy medications are taken orally.
Thyroid Medication
Following your follicular cancer treatment, you may be prescribed thyroid medication to maintain proper hormone levels. Depending on the patient’s needs, thyroid medicines can either increase or decrease the amount of thyroid hormones present in the body.

What Can I Expect Following Follicular Cancer Surgery?

Patients are usually released from the hospital 1-2 days after thyroid cancer surgery. You may have trouble swallowing at first; this is normal and a liquid diet may be recommended for the first few days of your recovery. Our thyroid surgeon will prescribe pain medication to alleviate any discomfort. Calcium supplements may be recommended to prevent hypocalcemia (low calcium levels in the blood). Vigorous activities and exercise should be avoided until permitted by Dr. Shin. In general, patients resume most of their daily activities within 2-3 weeks. Dr. Shin can further discuss guidelines, instructions, and timetables with you during your consultation for follicular thyroid cancer surgery.

How Do I Learn More About Follicular Thyroid Cancer In NYC?

Our thyroid cancer surgeon in NYC would be happy to discuss follicular thyroid cancer in more detail with you. To schedule a consultation, please call 646.943.7985 or request an appointment online at our NYC office.

WHAT PATIENTS SAY ABOUT DR. SHIN

Edward J. Shin, M.D.

NEW YORK SINUS & THYROID SURGERY CENTER

310 E. 14TH STREET
6TH FLOOR
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10003

646.943.7985

New York Eye & Ear Infirmary Of Mount Sinai

NEW YORK SINUS & THYROID SURGERY CENTER

310 E. 14TH STREET
6TH FLOOR
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10003

646.943.7985